PKI Blog

Authentication in an Ultra-Connected World: Internet of Things

Posted by Ted Shorter on Oct 1, 2015 6:05:00 AM

As PKI practitioners, we’ve been asked the question for years: “What’s the best way to get a digital certificate on _____?” What gets filled into the blank has expanded dramatically over time, however. Ten years ago, certificates landed primarily on what I’d describe as “traditional” IT infrastructure – servers, desktops, laptops, smart cards, RADIUS servers, or VPN concentrators. But since then, things have gotten much more interesting. Handheld scanners. Surgical robots. VOIP phones. Set-top boxes. Cable modems. Even heart monitors and IV pumps.

Read More

Topics: install certificates onto devices, digital certificates, cert, embedded systems, certificate, Microsoft Security Partner, expired digital certificate, Public Key Infrastructure, Certificate Management System (CMS), Industry Trends, Microsoft Public Key Infrastructure, Cisco Internet of Things, embedded certificates, embedded devices, Microsoft PKI, X.509 digital certificates, Internet of Things, IoT, Blog, Internet of Things (IoT), certificate install, BYOD, PKI Assurance

Where Does My Heartbleed Now?

Posted by Chris Hickman on Apr 15, 2014 6:00:29 AM

Vulnerabilities tend to morph over time. Upon initial identification, researchers, companies, and experts tend to rush to offer opinions, sometimes factual and sometimes less so.

Read More

Topics: Heartbleed, private key ssl, expired digital certificate, Public Key Infrastructure, Certificate Management System (CMS), Industry Trends, private keys, OpenSSL, Heartbleed vulnerability, private key, SSL certificate, Azure PKI, PKI, PKI as a Service (PKIaaS), heartbleed bug, SSL bug, private key heartbleed, Heartbleed android, Blog, private keys vulnerable

Publicly Trusted versus Trustworthy SSL Certificates

Posted by Wayne Harris on Apr 11, 2014 10:52:23 AM

In the wake of the Heartbleed bug, many are faced with the daunting (and expensive) prospect of replacing the SSL certificates on those vulnerable systems. This is due to the possibility that the private keys of exposed SSL certificates may or may not have been compromised. In the end, since there is no way to know for sure if your private keys have been compromised, many are opting to replace the SSL certificates of the affected system(s).

Read More

Topics: SSL certificates, cert, certificate, IT Security, Microsoft Security Partner, Heartbleed, expired digital certificate, Public Key Infrastructure, Certificate Management System (CMS), Industry Trends, OpenSSL, Microsoft Public Key Infrastructure, Azure PKI, PKI, PKI as a Service (PKIaaS), heartbleed bug, SSL PKI, Blog

Heartbleed Vulnerability: What You Need to Know

Posted by Wayne Harris on Apr 9, 2014 10:56:36 AM

On April 7, 2014 a severe vulnerability called “Heartbleed” was announced. Heartbleed is a vulnerability within the OpenSSL 1.0.1 series software that is described in the NIST CVE-2014-0160 announcement. In short, this vulnerability allows hackers access to portions of a vulnerable system’s memory, leading to the potential exposure of passwords, sensitive data, and certificate private keys on affected systems. Heartbleed accomplishes this by exploiting a weakness in the “TLS Heartbeat Extension,” exposing server memory. Even worse, this heartbeat attack can be repeated without the awareness of the victim, and each iteration reveals another 64k snapshot of memory to the attacker. This very serious vulnerability exposes the most sensitive data of affected systems.

The good news: the vulnerability has a patch. However, the widespread adoption of the OpenSSL 1.0.1 series software, coupled with the two years that this vulnerability has existed, means that the risks attributable to Heartbleed are enormous. Current estimates predict that over 500,000 systems may be vulnerable. Specifically, the Heartbleed vulnerability affects those systems that use OpenSSL 1.0.1 (a-f). Unfortunately, since this software is so widely implemented, many popular OS platforms are affected and thus vulnerable. I would suggest visiting the CERT Web Site for a more list of affected platforms. It is worth mentioning that this is a developing story, and as such, the list of affected platforms is likely to change.

Read More

Topics: 64k, Heartbleed SSL, Heartbleed, expired digital certificate, Public Key Infrastructure, Certificate Management System (CMS), Industry Trends, SSL vulnerability, OpenSSL, Heartbleed vulnerability, TLS Heartbeat Extension, Azure PKI, PKI as a Service (PKIaaS), NIST CVE-2014-0160, heartbleed bug, Internet of Things, Blog, heartbleed help

Five Common “DIY PKI” Mistakes to Avoid

Posted by Ted Shorter on Apr 4, 2014 3:20:46 AM

In the 12+ years that CSS has been helping organizations deploy Public Key Infrastructures, we frequently run into situations where PKI components are already present in the environment. Often it’s an older PKI that someone new to the organization has inherited and wants help evaluating; sometimes it’s a “temporary” deployment that an organization is looking to improve upon. In others, it may simply be a PKI design that a customer wants us to review and provide feedback before deployment. In any case, these “Do-It-Yourself” installations, like any PKI, can create problems, headaches, and occasionally even more serious issues if mistakes are made during the design, deployment, or operation of the PKI. And while it’s often quite easy to deploy PKI components, PKI does tend to be one of those technologies where you have exactly one chance to get it right: at install time. After that, many parameters are more or less set in stone, and a re-deployment becomes the only way to fix a mistake.

With that in mind, this is in no way an all-inclusive list, but here are five of the most common mistakes we see when encountering “DIY” PKI:

Read More

Topics: digital certificate, microsoft ca, IT Security, Microsoft Security Partner, PKI error, expired digital certificate, Public Key Infrastructure, Certificate Management System (CMS), Azure PKI, PKI, PKI as a Service (PKIaaS), CA, PKI deployment, PKI mistakes, Blog, PKI CA, DIY PKI, PKI installation

SHA-1 Signed Certificates No Longer Trusted?

Posted by Ted Shorter on Dec 10, 2013 4:47:24 AM

By now, you may have already heard that Microsoft will start deprecating trust in certificates with SHA-1 signatures in 2016. In our view, this is a prudent move by Microsoft. We've long known that SHA-1 was weakening, and showing signs that a practical attack similar to the 2008 demonstration against MD5 could appear in the next few years.

Read More

Topics: expired digital certificate, Public Key Infrastructure, Certificate Management System (CMS), Industry Trends, RSA Keys, PKIaaS, Azure PKI, PKI, Secure Hash Algorithm, PKI as a Service (PKIaaS), PKI as a Service, SHA1, SHA2, MD5 hash, Blog, SHA-1, SHA-2

Posts by Topic

see all

Want to Learn more about CSS?